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INTO London students reach final of London-wide innovation challenge

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INTO London students reach final of London-wide innovation challenge

International students on the Foundation Business Management and Law programme at INTO London recently competed against students from 23 London colleges, and have reached the final of the London Metropolitan University 2018 Big Idea Challenge!

International students on the Foundation Business Management and Law programme at INTO London recently competed against students from 23 London colleges, and have reached the final of the London Metropolitan University 2018 Big Idea Challenge! Competition has been tough, but the INTO London students have already gone head-to-head with teams from The City & Islington College, St Marks Academy, CONELL and all three of the New City Colleges, among others, and have got through to the final! The achievement of a place in the final was doubly special for INTO London, as it was the only International Foundation provider in the competition. The Big Idea Challenge began in November when London Metropolitan University held a business works… Read the full article
International students on the Foundation Business Management and Law programme at INTO London recently competed against students from 23 London colleges, and have reached the final of the London Metropolitan University 2018 Big Idea Challenge!

Competition has been tough, but the INTO London students have already gone head-to-head with teams from The City & Islington College, St Marks Academy, CONELL and all three of the New City Colleges, among others, and have got through to the final! The achievement of a place in the final was doubly special for INTO London, as it was the only International Foundation provider in the competition.

The Big Idea Challenge began in November when London Metropolitan University held a business workshop at INTO London. Teams of students had to create and pitch an innovative business idea to peers and staff from London Metropolitan University, who then chose a winning team. INTO London team ‘Tummy Yummy’s’ edible, waste-free cutlery idea gained them a place in the next stage of the competition

In the second stage, held at the Natwest Headquarters in Central London, students worked with industry experts from Microsoft, The Princes Trust, Natwest and many more, to refine their ideas and perfect their two-minute pitch before presenting it to a large audience.

The final stage will open the decision up to the general public, as it consists of students filming and posting videos of their ideas online. The team behind the video that receives the most votes will be crowned winner of the Big Idea Challenge 2018 at a special awards ceremony.

Business teacher Ala Tchalabi said that participating in the competition has enhanced the students’ confidence and presentation skills greatly. “The competition ties in perfectly with what the students have done in their World of Business module at INTO London, and encourages them to think about different business ideas as well as learning the steps involved in setting up a successful business,” he said.

“We are so proud of our students’ commitment and achievements so far, and wish them all the very best for further success in the final stages of this competition,” added INTO London Centre Director David Silbergh.

“Please keep your eyes peeled for the INTO London team’s video pitches, which will be circulated in the upcoming weeks, when you’ll get a chance to vote for them to become this year’s Big Idea winners!”

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Former INTO GCU student wins enterprise fellowship

An enterprising graduate from our partner, Glasgow Caledonian University, has been awarded a prestigious Royal Society of Edinburgh Enterprise Fellowship. Upon receiving the honour, entrepreneur Isatou Njai - who is from The Gambia, took the Foundation Business programme at INTO GCU, and gained a degree in International Business (Risk Management) at GCU - said: “I am delighted, incredibly excited and grateful to have been awarded a fellowship. It’s been an incredible journey for us so far and this is overwhelming.” The enterprise fellowship, which since 1997 has been conferred on more than 200 individuals, recognises promising science and technol… Read the full article
An enterprising graduate from our partner, Glasgow Caledonian University, has been awarded a prestigious Royal Society of Edinburgh Enterprise Fellowship.

Upon receiving the honour, entrepreneur Isatou Njai - who is from The Gambia, took the Foundation Business programme at INTO GCU, and gained a degree in International Business (Risk Management) at GCU - said: “I am delighted, incredibly excited and grateful to have been awarded a fellowship. It’s been an incredible journey for us so far and this is overwhelming.”

The enterprise fellowship, which since 1997 has been conferred on more than 200 individuals, recognises promising science and technology researchers and supports their development into successful entrepreneurs by awarding them a year’s salary, training and access to mentorship from RSE Fellows and other successful entrepreneurs.

Hippo & Hedgehog co-founders Isatou and her partner Paul Blackler, are getting used to receiving recognition for the company’s main product - Baotic, a drink made from African super fruit baobab – as it has also recently attracted a £1,000 grant from Santander Universities and Scottish Edge Wildcard funding of up to £10,000.

“The RSE Fellowship will support my personal development to grow as a female entrepreneurial leader. and will make a huge difference as we look to launch and scale Baotic, across the UK,” said Isatou.

GCU Pro Vice Chancellor and Vice Principal (Research), Professor Cam Donaldson, said: “We are delighted to see GCU capturing such prestigious awards at the interface of research, innovation and social benefit with talented GCU graduates who have come through our UHatch facility at the heart of it.”

UHatch Academic Director Professor Bruce Wood added: “We are thrilled and incredibly proud of Isatou’s latest fantastic achievement. This prestigious award will allow her to focus entirely on further developing the business.

“Seeing individuals and start-up companies that we are supporting at GCU flourish inspires the confidence of the other exciting fledgling companies we are supporting at the University though UHatch.”

“I can’t thank GCU, UHatch, Professor Bruce Wood, Professor John Lennon, Professor Cam Donaldson, Professor Doreen McClurg and Professor Kofi Aidoo enough,” said Isatou. “Their support has been fundamental to this achievement. I also hope it inspires other GCU students to secure their own RSE awards.”

The fellowship is the latest in a series of successes for Isatou. She won £5,000 for her company and a meet-and-greet with Sir Richard Branson after triumphing in the Virgin Media Voom Tour.

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Isatou For Website

INTO Giving donations give hope to the lost generation

INTO Giving has given GBP7,500 (US$9,885) to an organisation that is helping child refugees to continue their education. Since June 2016, Project Hope 4 Kids has been running an education program for those aged three to 15 in the Filippiada refugee camp in Northern Greece. In addition to traditional subjects, such as mathematics and English, the program focuses on art, as this helps the children to cope with any trauma they may have experienced.   The money, which was donated to INTO Giving by INTO employees and students, will enable Project Hope 4 Kids to purchase or build a third classroom at the camp, probably … Read the full article
INTO Giving has given GBP7,500 (US$9,885) to an organisation that is helping child refugees to continue their education.

Since June 2016, Project Hope 4 Kids has been running an education program for those aged three to 15 in the Filippiada refugee camp in Northern Greece. In addition to traditional subjects, such as mathematics and English, the program focuses on art, as this helps the children to cope with any trauma they may have experienced.  

The money, which was donated to INTO Giving by INTO employees and students, will enable Project Hope 4 Kids to purchase or build a third classroom at the camp, probably from a shipping container; provide a stipend for teachers; and recruit more teaching staff. 

Project Hope 4 Kids is a grass-roots, 100 per cent volunteer-driven group of like-minded individuals who want to make a small difference to refugee children. “This refugee crisis is unfortunately still impacting hundreds of thousands of innocent lives,” says Founder of Project Hope 4 Kids Erin Harrison Freeman.

“In fact, the situation is even more dire than before… there are now over 55,000 refugees stuck in Greece for what seems an indefinite period. They are unable to complete their journey, unable to make it to a country that will offer them safety and security.”

The children in the camp are fighting for their futures, and this program helps them to realise their hopes and dreams, benefits both them and their families, and ensures that they do not become a lost generation.

For more about the projects that INTO Giving is working with, please click here.

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Hope4kids1 For Website

Weather or not - INTO UEA teacher skis to class

INTO University of East Anglia English teacher Malle Payne refused to let anything, even last week's 'wintry weather,' keep her away from her classroom. Her dedication to her students and education was such that, after a quick glance out the window, she climbed into her attic, grabbed her 40-year-old skis, strapped them on and used them to glide the 3 miles/5 km from Hall Road to the Norwich campus. “I grew up in Finland – where there is much more snow –  and I used to ski to school as a child. I didn’t want to let my class down last week because of what we Scandinavians would view as a mere dusting! However, I did get a lot of surprised looks o… Read the full article
INTO University of East Anglia English teacher Malle Payne refused to let anything, even last week's 'wintry weather,' keep her away from her classroom.

Her dedication to her students and education was such that, after a quick glance out the window, she climbed into her attic, grabbed her 40-year-old skis, strapped them on and used them to glide the 3 miles/5 km from Hall Road to the Norwich campus.

“I grew up in Finland – where there is much more snow –  and I used to ski to school as a child. I didn’t want to let my class down last week because of what we Scandinavians would view as a mere dusting! However, I did get a lot of surprised looks on my way in to work, and a picture of me on my skis was even printed in the local paper – but it was well worth the effort!”

“When I eventually made it into the classroom, my slightly odd journey to work made for some interesting discussions – as did the snow itself, because many of the international students I teach are from Asia and the Middle East and had never even seen snow before, let alone skis.

Malle used the novel weather conditions to raise money for The Stroke Association through INTO Giving’s iGive campaign. The idea came to her when skiing into work, and a poster was quickly made offering students the opportunity to try her skis out around the INTO UEA campus. All the funds she raised will be increased by 20 per cent and matched for INTO Giving projects. 

“As you can imagine, the students were all pretty excited by the weather - there were lots of snowball fights, and plenty of slightly weird-looking snowmen appearing around the INTO UEA centre and accommodation buildings. The frost and snow also made the University campus look enchanting, though, and took me back to my childhood, and to the 1970s, when I had last used the skis in my home country.”

The students, too, could hardly contain their excitement: “I haven’t seen so much snow in my life,” said Mingze Zhu… “I made a snow man.  It was very cold, but when I finished, I felt a sense of achievement,” said Liu… “When I saw the snow, I felt very excited, because in my hometown there is no snow in winter,” added Lu…

Although she has lived in the UK for 35 years, Malle is still surprised by the UK’s inability to cope with a bit of real ‘weather’. “The whole idea of everything coming to a standstill when there is a bit of snow is a bit of a joke for the Scandinavian people. This is mild compared to what usually happens in Finland,” she says.

However, she can see the reasons behind being the UK being rendered essentially impassable. “There aren’t enough days in the year when there is a proper winter so I can see it would not be cost-effective to equip snow ploughs and winter tyres on cars,” she said.

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Malle On Skis For Website

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