LOOKING FOR OUR STUDENT SITE? Click here to visit intostudy.com
INTO News

Teaching and learning at INTO the University of Exeter

keyboard_arrow_down

Teaching and learning at INTO the University of Exeter

INTO News Editor Mary Kalmus spent a day as a student at INTO Exeter to see first-hand how teachers there are preparing students for university study by developing their subject knowledge, language and collaboration skills.

INTO News Editor Mary Kalmus spent a day as a student at INTO Exeter to see first-hand how teachers there are preparing students for university study by developing their subject knowledge, language and collaboration skills. 9am – Science with Science Teacher Julia de Ste Croix. Today’s topic: DNA In the morning, I joined 20 Biomedical, Life and Environmental Sciences Foundation students ready to learn all about DNA with INTO Exeter’s Science Teacher, Julie de Ste Croix. Julia’s experience and confidence were in evidence as she delivered the complicated concepts involved in DNA structure, function and replication via a mixture of talk, videos and guided worksheet exercises. When asked to work in groups, some of the … Read the full article
INTO News Editor Mary Kalmus spent a day as a student at INTO Exeter to see first-hand how teachers there are preparing students for university study by developing their subject knowledge, language and collaboration skills.

9am – Science with Science Teacher Julia de Ste Croix. Today’s topic: DNA

In the morning, I joined 20 Biomedical, Life and Environmental Sciences Foundation students ready to learn all about DNA with INTO Exeter’s Science Teacher, Julie de Ste Croix.

Julia’s experience and confidence were in evidence as she delivered the complicated concepts involved in DNA structure, function and replication via a mixture of talk, videos and guided worksheet exercises.

When asked to work in groups, some of the students seemed initially reluctant to engage with their classmates, which is understandable given it was the start of the new academic year and student bonds yet to be formed. “You will find that there will be lots of group work in university, especially in the medicine and medical sciences areas,” Julia told the class, which comprised students with medical ambitions, as well as ones wishing to study psychology, environmental science or biochemistry at university.

Under Julia’s watchful and encouraging eye, the groups of students soon settled down and focused on working together to complete the complex task of cutting and sticking paper fragments to form a DNA strand.

“There is a huge difference between the teaching here and in Nigeria. In Nigeria the teachers read to you from textbooks and you have to repeat the words exactly,” said student Sharon Ezems-Amadi, 17, who is hoping to study medicine at the University of Exeter. She is currently studying Science, Maths and English, and in her second semester will be adding Human Biology and Chemistry.

“In Julia’s class it’s ok so long as the answer is similar - it doesn’t have to be word for word. It is better here because you need to use your own ideas, words and initiative for medicine. It’s more flexible. I am enjoying it here 100 per cent. It is even better than I hoped it would be. Yes, it is a lot of work but it doesn’t seem like it, because it is fun and all the teachers make you do your own thinking.”

2pm - English with English Teacher Sophie Larkin. Today’s topic: Presentation skills

Sophie’s class (pictured) with the 18 International Year One Accounting and Finance students aimed to encourage students to reflect on and refine their presenting skills in preparation for their upcoming Formative Assessments.

Her teaching was centred on talking and collaboration, and she started off by asking the students to share their own shortcomings during a recent practice presentation with their neighbour. By encouraging them to focus on such aspects as how well they felt they had used their voices; how clear their slides had been; and how effective they had been in both inviting and answering questions, she provided them with a framework for success and showed a video in which experienced actor, Ewan McGregor, revealed the challenges of speaking in public.

Thanks to Sophie’s encouraging and positive presence, the groupwork section of the class, felt lively and easy. A couple of representatives from each group then revealed their findings on what makes for a ‘bad’ presentation to the rest of the class. It was great to see the students’ confidence and fluency as they put their new-found and invaluable study skills into practice

“Sophie is very energetic, speaks clearly and helps the students really well,” said Kathleen Anna from Indonesia, a 19-year-old student on the International Year One in Accounting and Finance. “My favourite topic is independent learning in the English class, as we get to reflect on our own progress and discuss with each other what we can do to improve ourselves.”

4pm- Management with Undergraduate Business Programme Manager Karen Glide. Today’s topic: Organisational Culture

‘What do we mean by culture?” Karen asked the lecture theatre of International Year One Management & Business Economics and Accounting & Finance students. Culture, she explained, includes such things as Halloween, but organisational culture is a different and powerful thing that goes far deeper than just, “how we do things around here.”

Karen challenged the class (with some help of a video of theorist Edgar Shien) to discuss  how organisations develop its culture and why it is difficult to change.

“Culture is like personality or character are for an individual, which is why culture is hard to change,” was just one of the many answers given, revealing a high level of attention and comprehension among the students.

Karen then challenged everyone to walk around the centre and bring back two clues to INTO Exeter’s own culture. “Bringing excellence and commitment to students,” read one student’s Post-It note response, “celebrates students that have done well,” and “the teachers’ open-door policy is useful for students,” read others. Karen concluded that cultural elements like these can be translated and described in business as ‘core values’.

5pm – reflections on my day

It was a great experience being in classes and experiencing the styles, standards, and qualities of INTO’s teaching. In all three classes, it was clear to see how teachers not only help shape and grow their students’ academic capabilities right from the start of their time with INTO, but also their confidence as they embark on their international education experience in a country different from home.

The teachers I met epitomise what each of our 1,800 employees stands for – being deeply committed to wanting to make the best possible experience for students, and giving them the skills, knowledge and confidence they will need to succeed at university. 

Close the article

President of INTO’s newest US partner shares her global view

In a recent TV interview, acting President of Suffolk University, Boston Marisa Kelly explained how the University’s partnership with INTO will work, and spoke powerfully about the benefits brought by international students. “INTO has recruiters all over the globe,” Marisa told Comcast Newsmakers journalist Jenny Johnson. “They will focus on the recruiting side, and we will focus on providing the English language courses, and also transitional courses, for students who are ready, that will allow them to get credit for their degrees.” Jenny then asked Marisa why the focus on international students. Because, said Marisa, “our international students are a huge strength for us.” The mix of students in the classroom is, … Read the full article
In a recent TV interview, acting President of Suffolk University, Boston Marisa Kelly explained how the University’s partnership with INTO will work, and spoke powerfully about the benefits brought by international students.

“INTO has recruiters all over the globe,” Marisa told Comcast Newsmakers journalist Jenny Johnson. “They will focus on the recruiting side, and we will focus on providing the English language courses, and also transitional courses, for students who are ready, that will allow them to get credit for their degrees.”

Jenny then asked Marisa why the focus on international students. Because, said Marisa, “our international students are a huge strength for us.” The mix of students in the classroom is, she added, “a critical part of the educational experience here.”

The economic benefits brought by international students are also considerable. “If we just look at Suffolk students alone who come here and often stay here after college, they contribute around $80m to the regional economy and provide 1,100 local jobs,” she said.

International students tend to stay in Suffolk after college because of the opportunities available to them and because, Marisa said: “of the nature of the education we provide.” And those students who do return to their home countries after graduation bring, she added, “valuable resources to those countries that ultimately benefit us in the United States.”

After watching the interview, INTO Co-Founder and Executive Vice-President (North America) John Sykes, said: “I was very interested to hear acting President Kelly speak first-hand about the added value that INTO is already bringing to them. Marisa’s observations on the importance of a globally diverse student experience resonate very powerfully with our own philosophy. This is exactly why we are so proud to partner with Suffolk

“We are very much looking forward over the coming years to working with the University to help more students from around the world take advantage of the superb education and opportunities available at Suffolk,” he said.

To see the full interview, please click here

Close the article
Marisa Kelly For Website

Learning languages and sharing cultures at UAB

INTO partnerships are known for its excellent academic programs and student services, and international students at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) now also have access to extra cultural and language exchange programs to enhance their studies while in the United States. “I participated in Language Partners when I first came to the US, and it absolutely helped me adapt to a new environment,” said Xinyu Zhai, a former international student from China. Now, as a member of the INTO UAB English faculty, Xinyu is coordinating a variety of language and cultural exchange programs similar to those that helped him. “Now as the Program Coordinator, I make connections,” said Xinyu. “I provide opportunities for Pathway students, domestic students and even volunteers from th… Read the full article
INTO partnerships are known for its excellent academic programs and student services, and international students at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) now also have access to extra cultural and language exchange programs to enhance their studies while in the United States.

“I participated in Language Partners when I first came to the US, and it absolutely helped me adapt to a new environment,” said Xinyu Zhai, a former international student from China. Now, as a member of the INTO UAB English faculty, Xinyu is coordinating a variety of language and cultural exchange programs similar to those that helped him.

“Now as the Program Coordinator, I make connections,” said Xinyu. “I provide opportunities for Pathway students, domestic students and even volunteers from the community to get to know each other. Most importantly, our students at INTO UAB are becoming more involved in the American society.”

Students at UAB now have the opportunity to take part in three different exchange programs, including UAB’s Language Partners. During the weekly sessions, international students have opportunities to talk to native English-speaking volunteers to practice their speaking and listening, learn about American culture and make American friends.

“I was curious about what it would be like in a group discussion with new friends from around the world,” said Linh Pham, a Biotechnology Pathway student from Vietnam who is participating in Language Partners. “At first, I thought it was supposed to be formal, but it’s turned out the conversation between us is really comfortable and fun. We share our school experience, and my English skills have also improved.”

The two newest exchange programs beginning in Fall 2017 include a Chinese/English Language Exchange sponsored by INTO UAB and the UAB Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, as well as a Culture Partners program connecting UAB Honors College freshmen and INTO UAB Undergraduate Pathway students.

In the Language Exchange, students studying in UAB’s Chinese minor will meet with Chinese-speaking Academic English and Pathway students to help each other with the new languages they are learning, ideally splitting their sessions into half-English and half-Chinese. As the Language Exchange program grows, plans are in place to begin an exchange with all of the foreign languages offered at UAB.

Culture Partners is a semester-long project in which Undergraduate Pathway students and freshmen from the UAB Honors College pair up to explore their new university as well as the greater Birmingham area, while posting their adventures and a selfie on a special Facebook page. Students in the class have already explored Birmingham’s parks and museums, cafes and restaurants and have attended UAB football games together.

“Learning about another culture can be an excellent way to become aware of one’s own culture,” said Dr Josephine Prado, professor in the UAB School of Education and Honors College. “In sharing fun experiences every week, students will hopefully get to know each other - and their own cultures better.”

Visit the language partners website to learn more. 

Close the article
UAB World Language For Website

INTO students have a hoot at Halloween

Take a look - if you dare - at the spooky activities and eerie happenings that took place for students at some of our US and UK centres... INTO UoG is for… Unbelievably odd and gruesome This year, INTO University of Gloucestershire celebrated Halloween with a creepy late-night party featuring monster DJs, scary students and spooky cocktails! On Friday October 27, both UK and INTO students at UoG were invited to ‘The Stag’ at Park Campus for the first party to have been jointly organised by INTO UoG and University Student Engagement Manager, Matt Wester. Many students got into the spirit of the event by dressing up – and, not to be … Read the full article
Take a look - if you dare - at the spooky activities and eerie happenings that took place for students at some of our US and UK centres...

INTO UoG is for… Unbelievably odd and gruesome

This year, INTO University of Gloucestershire celebrated Halloween with a creepy late-night party featuring monster DJs, scary students and spooky cocktails!

On Friday October 27, both UK and INTO students at UoG were invited to ‘The Stag’ at Park Campus for the first party to have been jointly organised by INTO UoG and University Student Engagement Manager, Matt Wester. Many students got into the spirit of the event by dressing up – and, not to be outdone, INTO staff came along as a zombie and a witch’s cat.

The students were greeted by spiders’ webs, skeletons and zombies and an “Enter if you dare!” sign and, throughout the evening, enjoyed a variety of music played by three DJs from the University radio station.

“This was our first time teaming up with Tone Radio, who really kept the music going and got students dancing all evening,” said Student Experience Coordinator Hannah Hudman. “The party was very successful, as there were well over 70 students there.”

“The Halloween Party was a great chance to meet new people, I enjoyed the music and it was very funny to see people in costumes,” said student Mireia Colom Roca, who is from Spain.

USF is for… ugly spiders and fangs

Success in INTO University of South Florida’s door-decorating contest hinged on creativity and pure scariness.

The three student judges had a hard task choosing a winner from the 13 entries, but in the end, Senior International Student Advisor Mary Ellen (Lynn) Smith closed the deal by dressing up as a witch herself!

In second place was Donna Rock, Tutoring Coordinator’s door featuring ghostlings and a huge spider’s web containing pictures of all 40 INTO tutors! Human Resources Coordinator, Keila Perez and Payroll Specialist, Wanda Baez carried off third prize with a double door display - one door was a kitty, the other a mummy.

All-in-all it was a busy week or so of Halloween preparations, as on October 26, over 30 INTO USF students attended a Halloween party and participated in traditional pumpkin carving activities and Halloween cookie decorating. Click here to see the doors and here for photos of pumpkin carving.

INTO QUB is for… Queen’s utterly brilliant costumes

There were hoots of hilarity in the café area of INTO Queen’s University Belfast, as around 15 students and three Social Assistants scooped out and carved up their first pumpkins.

INTO QUB students entered further into the Halloween spirit by putting on costumes and make-up. When asked to describe her first Halloween in the UK, International Foundation in Business, Humanities and Social Sciences student Chen Chong, who is from China, said: “I thought it was very funny how everyone dressed up and had their faces painted. We went out to clubs and had some fun with local students and it was a really fantastic and fun experience.”

“The students enjoyed their first Halloween in the UK, and were excited about the customs and traditions surrounding it,” added Head of Student Services Aine McComb.

INTO WSU is for… Wizards, spooks and the undead!

On Halloween day, 100 INTO Washington State University students, plus international programs staff and faculty got together for a ‘spooky good time’ at Kruegel Hall.

Lunch was followed by a Halloween-themed photo booth provided by the WSU newspaper, The Daily Evergreen. “This was one of the best activities that we have had so far, in part because we had the highest number of student participation, along with teachers and staff,” said INTO WSU Student Services Coordinator, Linda Mittelhammer.

“The event brought us all together and allowed everyone to have a lot of fun. The students loved seeing their staff and teachers in costume, and even students that have been somewhat shy picked out costume items from the photo booth and had pictures taken with other students. Those that came in costume were proud of what they created for their first Halloween in the US. Can’t wait until next year!” she said.

“It was an awesome first experience! Way beyond my expectation!” said INTO WSU Graduate Pathway student Disha Shetty. “When Grad school is a patience tester, there comes a Halloween party as a stress buster. With all the food and amazing fun, we enjoyed it to the full and complained about none,” added fellow Graduate Pathway student Afshan Mirza.

INTO EXE is for… Extremely eerie

No sinister stone was left unturned when planning INTO the University of Exeter’s Halloween party.

After dark on Monday October 30, nearly 50 students appeared at Duryard residence halls ready to get a trick or a treat and take part in a variety of terrifying activities like a mummy-wrapping race, apple- and donut-bobbing and ‘blood pong’ – a non-alcoholic version of ‘beer pong’. There was also plenty of dancing, sweets and a scary movie with popcorn. Refreshments included Zombie Eye and Vampire Teeth punches and toffee apples.

The event was planned and organised by Student Engagement Coordinator Katie Jones and a couple of current INTO students who are on the social committee. “The preparation was fun, and the party was also fun and I’m sure everyone who came enjoyed it! I was proud to be one of the organisers,” said Natsumi Okada from Japan, who is on the Humanities Foundation programme at INTO Exeter.

Close the article
IMG 1336

News, press release and media coverage archive add

keyboard_arrow_up